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Effect of Coronavirus on Student Exchange Across the World

Here are some statistics by EAIE on the effect of Covid19 Pandemic on student exchange (both inbound student exchange as well as outbound exchange) as well as faculty mobility.

#studentexchange #EAIE #highereducation #internationaleducation #education #internationalisation

https://student-exchange.org/eaie-survey-on-impact-of-covid-19-on-mobility/

You can read the full report here: Covid-19Report_FA

Some Recommendations for Postgraduate Students Thinking of a PhD

Many postgraduate students will think of their future in terms of industry or a PhD. Especially in the competitive world of the 21st century, doing a PhD can be very helpful in establishing yourself as an expert in a field of your choice. Scholar Journal is a blog which has been stared by me for young scholars and researchers to get guidance on their future opportunities. It will also be developed more in time so that the Scholar Journal will also serve as aan academic portal for young scientists ands

Old gas remnant from Uranus found in vintage Voyager 2 data

Buried inside data that NASA’s iconic Voyager 2 spacecraft gathered at Uranus more than 30 years ago is the signature of a massive bubble that may have stolen a blob of the planet’s gassy atmosphere.

That’s according to scientists who analyzed archived Voyager 2 observations of the magnetic field around Uranus. These measurements had been studied before, but only using a relatively coarse view. In the new research, scientists instead looked at those measurements every two seconds. That detail showed what had previously been missed: an abrupt zigzag in the magnetic field readings that lasted just one minute of the spacecraft’s 45-hour journey past Uranus.

The tiny wobble in the Voyager 2 data represents something much larger since the spacecraft was flying so fast. Specifically, the scientists behind the new research believe the zigzag marks a plasmoid, a type of structure that wasn’t understood particularly well at the time of the flyby in January 1986.

But by now, plasmoids have earned scientists’ respect. A plasmoid is a massive bubble of plasma, which is a soup of charged particles. Plasmoids can break off from the tip of the sleeve of magnetism surrounding a planet like a teardrop.

Scientists have studied these structures at Earth and nearby planets, but never at Uranus or its neighbor Neptune, since Voyager 2 is the only spacecraft to date ever to visit those planets.

Scientists want to know about plasmoids because these structures can pull charged particles out of a planet’s atmosphere and fling them into space. And if you change a planet’s atmosphere, you change the planet itself. And Uranus’ situation is particularly complicated because the planet rotates on its side and its magnetic field is skewed from both that axis and the plane all the planets lie in

SpaceX, NASA Aim For Historic Crew Launch In Mid-May Despite Coronavirus Outbreak

The first crewed orbital launch from American soil is scheduled to lift off just two months from now, despite the coronavirus outbreak.

Hurley and Bob Behnken to the International Space Station (ISS) aboard SpaceX’s Crew Dragon capsule, NASA officials confirmed in a media advisory on Wednesday (March 18).

The flight, which will employ a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, will lift off from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. KSC was the jumping-off point for the last homegrown orbital human spaceflight — STS-135, whose July 2011 launch kicked off the final mission of NASA’s space shuttle program. (Suborbital flight is a different story: Virgin Galactic has launched two crewed test missions to suborbital space, in December 2018 and February 2019.)

Fly High with a Career in Aerospace Engineering

Aerospace Engineering is one of the most fascinating subjects having two main branches of aeronautics and astronautics, which also have sub-branches amongst themselves. While aeronautical engineering specialises in aircraft, helicopters, unmanned aerial vehicles and missiles (basically everything that flies within the limits of Earth’s atmosphere), astronautical engineering includes rockets, satellites, space stations, space shuttles and spacecraft that fly beyond Earth’s atmosphere.

The scope for aerospace engineering is literally beyond stars. An aerospace engineer designs, tests, constructs and maintains aircraft and spacecraft. In India, the industry is one of the fastest growing with civil, defense and space segments showing significant growth potential.

Aeronautics

Planes and helicopters carrying people fly across the skies in Earth’s atmosphere. India’s civil aviation industry is on a high-growth trajectory due to fast economic growth in recent years and sizeable increase in real consumer spending. Airlines flew nearly 100 million passengers on domestic routes last year.

The government has ushered in a new era of expansion – driven by low-cost carriers, modern airports, foreign direct investments and growing emphasis on regional connectivity. The air transport sector already supports eight million jobs and contributes 72 billion dollars to the GDP.

According to International Air Transport Association (IATA), India will displace Britain to be the third largest aviation market with 278 million passengers in 2026. In 2035, IATA expects the Indian market to serve 442 million passengers and rank as the world’s largest aviation market.

US plane maker forecasts that Indian airlines will need 1,850 new planes valued at 265 billion dollars in the next 20 years, churning up huge demand for pilots, aircraft maintenance engineers and ground handling staff. In addition, Indian engineers are well known for their skills and many of them provide their work to foreign aeronautics companies outsourcing their work to India. This is also expected to increase with the growth of the domestic and international aviation sector.

Astronautics

Phenomenal transformations are taking place globally with commercial space travel likely to become reality in the next five years. Private companies, government agencies and educational institutions are collaborating to accelerate human transition into a sustainable multi-planetary species.

Moon Express, the first private company in history to receive government permission to travel beyond Earth’s orbit, is planning its maiden lunar mission to take place in late 2017. Naveen Jain, its billionaire co-founder and former Microsoft employee, hopes to find water, Helium-3, gold, platinum and rare earth metals on the surface.

Bengaluru-based Team Indus, which was India’s first and only startup to have received one million dollars from Google Lunar XPrize last year and it too seems set to create history. By next Republic Day – on January 26, 2018 – the startup plans to land its first spacecraft on the Moon, travel at least 500 metres on its surface, and send back images and videos. Team Indus also plans to put the Indian flag on the Moon’s surface on Republic Day.

The spacecraft will be launched on December 28 aboard vehicle PSLV-XL in association with Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO). After a successful Mars Orbiter Mission (MoM), ISRO is eyeing inter-planetary missions to Jupiter and Venus. It recently created a world record by launching 104 satellites at one go on board its vehicle PSLV-C37.

The learnings will have immense benefits for oil exploration, increasing use of tele-medicines in remote areas and disaster mitigation missions in emergencies. Clearly, India is a strong player in space exploration and there will be lot of opportunities for young scientists, engineers and such professionals in future to work on fundamental functions.

Opportunities

There is high demand and competition for good aerospace engineers in various streams. Job opportunities are available in airlines, helicopter companies, aviation companies, corporate research companies, the Air Force, Defense Ministry, Hindustan Aeronautics Limited, ISRO and many others. Plane manufacturers like Boeing and Airbus also have huge engineering centers in India as part of their global supply chains.

While the country is home to a million engineering graduates every year, it is the industry readiness of this vast talent pool that will play a key role in achieving the vision of creating a scalable and sustainable aerospace ecosystem.

The aerospace industry needs engineers with right technical skills combined with applicable soft skills. A background in mechanical, electrical and electronic engineering or mechatronics, materials (for example composites) and system integration knowledge is only the start.

To build up such an ecosystem for aerospace, India needs technology and capability to cover the complete lifecycle of aerospace products encompassing research and development, engineering, manufacturing, testing and after-market services.

The future

Engineering talent needs to be trained and exposed to international experiences to spark innovation and creative thinking. Global skills make them receptive to world-class standards of safety and quality. Indian students must strive to get such experience for career advancement. The industry and government too should focus on deploying more funds for scholarships and training programmes to tackle these key challenges.

Industry readiness of the graduates or diploma holders is vital to meet the needs of aerospace and defence industry – especially now when the government has launched ‘Make in India’ initiative to attract domestic and foreign investments, so that the country can emerge as a low-cost, high-quality manufacturing hub on the global horizon.

Over the next two decades, aerospace engineering will extend its reach to serve societal needs domestically and globally in areas like health care for remote areas, energy efficiency, alternative energy, environmental sustainability, disaster mitigation and homeland security. Future engineers will thus move the industry to a new level with expanded markets and grand challenges.

Many industry leaders and policy makers believe that passenger space travel will grow rapidly, creating new employment for millions of people and profoundly changing our daily life on Earth. Quite naturally, professional advancements will increasingly depend on the ability to succeed in international contexts.

You can read the original article here: https://aerospacelectures.com/fly-high-with-a-career-in-aerospace-engineering/

The writer is a Professor of Aerospace Engineering and Advisory Council Member at UN Centre for Space Science and Space Technology Education in Asia and Pacific (CSSTEAP).

Importance of International Student Mobility Platforms for Cooperative International University Networks

As world progresses, the concept of higher education is becoming more and more complex with additional requirements each day. The classical higher education systems of using chalk and blackboard and writing equations on board for students to memorize has long been outdated and today we live in a world of hybrid education platforms, online classes and interactive learning. Nowadays, students want to learn know-how from experienced individuals, and they demand a more practical approach to learning their professions. Hence, many universities are competing with each other in order to be able to provide the best possible education platforms and opportunities for their students. Of course, one of the more important concepts in a globally competitive university is the student mobility opportunities that are provided by the International Department of the concerned University. Nowadays, there are variety of programs that allow students to go for mobility programs such as semester exchange, international internships, dual degrees, summer schools and many more. Hence, in order to meet this demand, every university within their financial means are trying to establish an international network to provide as many opportunities as possible to their students. There are many studies to suggest that student mobility in any form enhances the student’s learning ability as well as their adaptability to various situations.

As world progresses, the concept of higher education is becoming more and more complex with additional requirements each day. The classical higher education systems of using chalk and blackboard and writing equations on board for students to memorize has long been outdated and today we live in a world of hybrid education platforms, online classes and interactive learning. Nowadays, students want to learn know-how from experienced individuals, and they demand a more practical approach to learning their professions. Hence, many universities are competing with each other in order to be able to provide the best possible education platforms and opportunities for their students. Of course, one of the more important concepts in a globally competitive university is the student mobility opportunities that are provided by the International Department of the concerned University. Nowadays, there are variety of programs that allow students to go for mobility programs such as semester exchange, international internships, dual degrees, summer schools and many more. Hence, in order to meet this demand, every university within their financial means are trying to establish an international network to provide as many opportunities as possible to their students. There are many studies to suggest that student mobility in any form enhances the student’s learning ability as well as their adaptability to various situations.

There are 2 different ways where such mobility programs can be taken to a higher level. One would be to become member of bigger networks such as Association of Commonwealth Universities or more regional networks such as the Indo-French Academic Alliance or the Balkan Universities Network etc. In these types of networks, each university is independent and contributes and receives equally from the network itself. If the international department of the university is proactive, then it’s possible to create new partnerships with other members of the network, which can be leveraged for student mobility, faculty mobility as well as for research collaborations. In this system, the university must be proactive and requires constant effort, but the overall results can help the students to have access to hundreds of universities. However, the main problem with these associations or alliances is that each university is fully independent and thus again student mobility depends on each member’s willingness, though bureaucracy between the association member is usually very low, which allows for greater mobility.

One of the most important players in the world higher education system is the university partner networks such as Laureates International or GUS Higher Education Systems. These are large conglomerates, where several universities from various countries have come together under a single leadership to create a large university system that behaves as a single unit and creates partnerships between its members. These types of networks also try to leverage the strengths of their various members to create a stronger system within their members as well as in their overall network.

However, one such problem that large university conglomerates such as Laureates and GUS face is the fact that while these networks are very strong in leveraging their internal members, they are usually deficient in creating proper student mobility platforms between their internal members as well as with external universities. For example, none of these international university networks have special digital platforms to organize and coordinate student mobility as a system between their members as well as with outside partners. Usually each member university through their own international department will create their own partnerships (with another network institution or with outside); but since no centralized international center exists, there won’t be dedicated or focused efforts to maximize the opportunities for students. Perhaps this is one of the reasons why the world’s largest university network Laureates International was not able to leverage these opportunities to grow and ended up downsizing its network. Same can be said for other networks such as GUS and BAU and others, as they also don’t seem to have this centralized system for student mobility within and outside their own networks. Perhaps in the future, if these networks also utilize such centralized systems and repositories for mobility, it may be possible for them to grow again.

One of the best examples of a proper centralized student mobility network can be given as ISEP (International Student Exchange Program). ISEP has been around for more than 40 years (much longer than many university networks such as Laureates or Balkan Universities Network etc.) and while they have been initially funded partially by the US Government, now they have become a private, independent body with over 350+ members. Any student within the ISEP network can go to any of these 350+ institutions under various modes including zero tuition fee, zero accommodation fee etc. All of this has created an ever-growing network and unlike many of the examples above, there is a central digital repository and coordination center that places each student to the destination of their choice. Through ISEP, thousands of students have experienced academic and cultural mobility programs and as a result, have received an appreciation and understanding of global citizenship while advancing their academic agenda at the same time.

Without a doubt, international student mobility is one of the most important components of higher education and it will contribute to overall global advancement of knowledge and understanding. Especially in technical education, having a different perspective by having a student mobility experience in another country can have immense positive consequences for that particular student. Hence, each university and its corresponding network should make the utmost effort for allowing students to have opportunities for mobility. Unfortunately, still many universities and networks still hasn’t understood the importance of this concept; but luckily with ever increasing awareness of students, it will become more and more paramount for these organizations to make a best case effort for true and free student mobility.

There are 2 different ways where such mobility programs can be taken to a higher level. One would be to become member of bigger networks such as Association of Commonwealth Universities or more regional networks such as the Indo-French Academic Alliance or the Balkan Universities Network etc. In these types of networks, each university is independent and contributes and receives equally from the network itself. If the international department of the university is proactive, then it’s possible to create new partnerships with other members of the network, which can be leveraged for student mobility, faculty mobility as well as for research collaborations. In this system, the university must be proactive and requires constant effort, but the overall results can help the students to have access to hundreds of universities. However, the main problem with these associations or alliances is that each university is fully independent and thus again student mobility depends on each member’s willingness, though bureaucracy between the association member is usually very low, which allows for greater mobility.

One of the most important players in the world higher education system is the university partner networks such as Laureates International or GUS Higher Education Systems. These are large conglomerates, where several universities from various countries have come together under a single leadership to create a large university system that behaves as a single unit and creates partnerships between its members. These types of networks also try to leverage the strengths of their various members to create a stronger system within their members as well as in their overall network.

However, one such problem that large university conglomerates such as Laureates and GUS face is the fact that while these networks are very strong in leveraging their internal members, they are usually deficient in creating proper student mobility platforms between their internal members as well as with external universities. For example, none of these international university networks have special digital platforms to organize and coordinate student mobility as a system between their members as well as with outside partners. Usually each member university through their own international department will create their own partnerships (with another network institution or with outside); but since no centralized international center exists, there won’t be dedicated or focused efforts to maximize the opportunities for students. Perhaps this is one of the reasons why the world’s largest university network Laureates International was not able to leverage these opportunities to grow and ended up downsizing its network. Same can be said for other networks such as GUS and BAU and others, as they also don’t seem to have this centralized system for student mobility within and outside their own networks. Perhaps in the future, if these networks also utilize such centralized systems and repositories for mobility, it may be possible for them to grow again.

One of the best examples of a proper centralized student mobility network can be given as ISEP (International Student Exchange Program). ISEP has been around for more than 40 years (much longer than many university networks such as Laureates or Balkan Universities Network etc.) and while they have been initially funded partially by the US Government, now they have become a private, independent body with over 350+ members. Any student within the ISEP network can go to any of these 350+ institutions under various modes including zero tuition fee, zero accommodation fee etc. All of this has created an ever-growing network and unlike many of the examples above, there is a central digital repository and coordination center that places each student to the destination of their choice. Through ISEP, thousands of students have experienced academic and cultural mobility programs and as a result, have received an appreciation and understanding of global citizenship while advancing their academic agenda at the same time.

Without a doubt, international student mobility is one of the most important components of higher education and it will contribute to overall global advancement of knowledge and understanding. Especially in technical education, having a different perspective by having a student mobility experience in another country can have immense positive consequences for that particular student. Hence, each university and its corresponding network should make the utmost effort for allowing students to have opportunities for mobility. Unfortunately, still many universities and networks still hasn’t understood the importance of this concept; but luckily with ever increasing awareness of students, it will become more and more paramount for these organizations to make a best case effort for true and free student mobility.

Note: The author is an international professor and an education consultant for several years and he can be contacted at www.drguven.com and further knowledge about student exchange can be read at https://student-exchange.org/

Keywords: international student mobility, student exchange, student international, international internships

Tags: #studentmobility #mobility #studentexchange #laureates #GUS #IndoFrenchAlliance

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/importance-international-student-mobility-platforms-university-guven/?trackingId=6NopOUQGR%2BeBOWAZ%2FA6WWQ%3D%3D

 

 

Student Exchange Blog for Students Looking for International Student Exchange

I recommend the following blog for general questions about student exchange and student mobility and international internship applications. Student Mobility can be a great opportunity for students to have international exposure and to strengthen their CVs

https://student-exchange.org/category/blog/

New Book by Dr Guven – Reflections of the Millennium: Return of the Builders

New Book by Dr Guven – Reflections of the Millennium: Return of the Builders has just been recently published. This is the first science fiction novel by Dr Ugur GUVEN to examine the scenario of humanity meeting a very advanced extra terrestrial race.

Dr. Ugur GUVEN, Amazon Publications, USA, 2020,                ISBN: 979-8601839471

 

Kindle Editionhttps://www.amazon.com/dp/B0842BGDG6

Print Edition:   https://www.amazon.com/dp/B083XVH922?ref_=pe_3052080_397514860

New Book By Dr Guven – The Future of Humanity

New book by Dr Ugur GUVEN has just been recently published.

The Future of Humanity: Do Cosmos and Chance Really Affect our Fate?

The non fiction book deals with the forces that has effected the development of humanity and civilizations and how these forces such as entropy and time and gravity will continue to effect the future development of humanity.  The book also examines futuristic trends and changes such as interstellar travel and quantum computing and tries to show what humanity is going to become. You can buy the hard copy of the book or buy the Kindle Editions in below links:

• US Kindle Store, Amazon.com: United States
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B083LCV2D1

• UK Kindle Store, Amazon.co.uk: United Kingdom (including Guernsey, Isle of Man, Ireland, Gibraltar, and Jersey)
https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B083LCV2D1

• DE Kindle Store, Amazon.de: Austria, Germany, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, and Switzerland
https://www.amazon.de/dp/B083LCV2D1

• FR Kindle Store, Amazon.fr: France, Monaco, Belgium, Switzerland, and Luxembourg
https://www.amazon.fr/dp/B083LCV2D1

• ES Kindle Store, Amazon.es: Andorra, Spain
https://www.amazon.es/dp/B083LCV2D1

• IT Kindle Store, Amazon.it: Italy, San Marino, Vatican City, and Switzerland
https://www.amazon.it/dp/B083LCV2D1

• NL Kindle Store, Amazon.nl: Netherlands
https://www.amazon.nl/dp/B083LCV2D1

• JP Kindle Store, Amazon.co.jp: Japan
https://www.amazon.co.jp/dp/B083LCV2D1

• BR Kindle Store, Amazon.com.br: Brazil
https://www.amazon.com.br/dp/B083LCV2D1

• CA Kindle Store, Amazon.ca: Canada
https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B083LCV2D1

• MX Kindle Store, Amazon.com.mx: Mexico
https://www.amazon.com.mx/dp/B083LCV2D1

• AU Kindle Store, Amazon.com.au: Australia
https://www.amazon.com.au/dp/B083LCV2D1

• IN Kindle Store, Amazon.in: India
https://www.amazon.in/dp/B083LCV2D1

Dr Guven Becomes the Executive Coordinator of Indo-French Academic Alliance

Indo-French Academic Alliance was formed in front of French and Indian Government officials as an international entity. Dr Ugur GUVEN as one of the initiators of the Alliance (IFA) has become its honorary Executive Coordinator.

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